stillast*r

It just seems like we're taking all the last vowels out of words now.
"Comics memoirist Alison Bechdel is one of this year’s 21 new MacArthur Fellows, and she’s just the second cartoonist ever to be awarded the honor. Bechdel tells the L.A. Times she’s going to use the $650,000 grant to "pay off some debts, save for retirement — really boring stuff." Here’s hoping she discussed this good news with another woman and never once mentioned a man." (via Alison Bechdel Wins MacArthur Genius Grant)

"Comics memoirist Alison Bechdel is one of this year’s 21 new MacArthur Fellows, and she’s just the second cartoonist ever to be awarded the honor. Bechdel tells the L.A. Times she’s going to use the $650,000 grant to "pay off some debts, save for retirement — really boring stuff." Here’s hoping she discussed this good news with another woman and never once mentioned a man." (via Alison Bechdel Wins MacArthur Genius Grant)

We started in Denial. We are still going.

We started in Denial. We are still going.

"… I miss the time when we were still defined by our music. When our music was still our music. I miss being younger, with a head full of subversive ideas; white cables snaking down my neck, stolen songs in my pocket. There will never be an app for that." (via On Death and iPods: A Requiem)

"… I miss the time when we were still defined by our music. When our music was still our music. I miss being younger, with a head full of subversive ideas; white cables snaking down my neck, stolen songs in my pocket. There will never be an app for that." (via On Death and iPods: A Requiem)

Favorite colors. Fall. Family.  (at Visual Arts Gallery)

Favorite colors. Fall. Family. (at Visual Arts Gallery)

Case in point: the paper panties that you must wear during treatments. In most massages I have had the world over, you get to choose if you wear the disposable underwear left on the table, but in this country, not wearing them is a decided affront. We will whip off your towel and pour hot oil on your boobs, but don’t think about taking off those ill-fitting and uncomfortable cardboard briefs. — I am getting all the wrong kinds of massages. (via Italian Spa Tip: Prepare for 2nd-Base Action)
Some parties are perfect. #homegrown #TplusK2014 🌈

Some parties are perfect. #homegrown #TplusK2014 🌈

leitch:

Three years ago, I wrote a piece for New York magazine’s 10th anniversary of 9/11 issue about the Naudet brothers, the two French men who were (initially) the only people to film the first plane hitting the World Trade Center. The piece ended up getting cut — there was just so much good stuff in that issue, which won a National Magazine Award — and I remembered this morning that it never ran, so here it is, on the 13th anniversary. Remember that it was the 10th anniversary when this was supposed to run, so add three years to everything. They were very nice guys.
While filming a documentary about “probie” firefighter Tony Benetatos, Jules Naudet heard that now-infamous rumbling and panned his camera up just in time to catch American Airlines Flight 11 hit the North Tower. It remains one of the only two known videos of the North Tower impact, and definitely the clearest one. That split-second pan – “it was just an instinctive reaction,” he says – turned the tiny documentary on firefighter brotherhood he and his brother Gideon had been working on into one of the most widely seen documentaries of all time.

Ten years later, the project (which they directed with firefighter James Hanlon) has become their own version of Michael Apted’s famous “7 Up” series; they come back to their subjects for an update every five years or so. A new – and the brothers say final – version of the film will air on CBS on the 10th anniversary, with a new 25-minute epilogue that concentrates on the serious health woes firefighters and first-responders have suffered in recent years, and the lack of federal support. “It is extraordinary how much the firefighter today is going to die after saving 20,000 people on that day and every single day,” Jules says. “He is going to die alone, abandoned by his city, by his government, by his country. It is amazing.”

When the brothers, in the weeks after 9/11, went back to their editing studio and realized what they had, they turned down countless offers to simply sell all the footage to a network or movie studio, insisting on having control over their own film. Les Moonves of CBS – with a hand from family friend Graydon Carter and their agent, then-William Morris bigshot Ben Silverman – gave them that freedom, and they keep final cut to this day. For many, the showing of the Naudet brothers’ film on the second-anniversary of the attacks, the first night of the Tribute in Light, was a chance to heal among groups huddled around a television. “We wanted people to live by proxy through the film,” Jules says. “We made it a point not to make it about the political implications.”

For whatever reason, perhaps the brothers’ heavy French accents, there is a general misconception that the Naudets just happened to grab their footage before heading back to Paris or something. But they grew up on the Upper East Side, in the same apartment that Gideon, 38, still lives in (Jules, 41, who has two children, moved to Connecticut). “I think they imagine us as tourists or something,” Gideon says. “Like we spent two weeks filming and we moved back. This is our city.” In the last decade, they’ve made another film for CBS, a documentary about religious faith called “In God’s Eyes,” and they’re currently working on a film in which they speak with all living former White House Chiefs of Staff about their crazy jobs. But they’ll always be known as the 9/11 filmmakers, which would be easily to handle if more people realized they were professional filmmakers, rather than just two dopes who happened to be standing near the towers. “For us, nothing much has changed,” Gideon says. “We still go and have to start from zero. We go and see different networks and get the same answers. Sorry, we are not interested. It is exactly like for ‘9/11.’  Then we end up producing it and financing it ourselves. I guess we got used to it.”

They also have a somewhat more modern headache, what Urban Dictionary might call a “Santorum Problem:” If you search either one of their names on Google, because Jules’ initial pan up was breathtaking and unique, you find countless pages of conspiracy theorists accusing the brothers of being CIA plants, having foreknowledge of 9/11 or even helping orchestrate the attacks themselves. In a cruel irony, much of the “evidence” is based in the fact that the brothers have been so quiet over the last decade, as if they were plants, or even silenced. I can vouch for their existence. “Please tell them I am not a UFO,” Jules says.

leitch:

Three years ago, I wrote a piece for New York magazine’s 10th anniversary of 9/11 issue about the Naudet brothers, the two French men who were (initially) the only people to film the first plane hitting the World Trade Center. The piece ended up getting cut — there was just so much good stuff in that issue, which won a National Magazine Award — and I remembered this morning that it never ran, so here it is, on the 13th anniversary. Remember that it was the 10th anniversary when this was supposed to run, so add three years to everything. They were very nice guys.

While filming a documentary about “probie” firefighter Tony Benetatos, Jules Naudet heard that now-infamous rumbling and panned his camera up just in time to catch American Airlines Flight 11 hit the North Tower. It remains one of the only two known videos of the North Tower impact, and definitely the clearest one. That split-second pan – “it was just an instinctive reaction,” he says – turned the tiny documentary on firefighter brotherhood he and his brother Gideon had been working on into one of the most widely seen documentaries of all time.

Ten years later, the project (which they directed with firefighter James Hanlon) has become their own version of Michael Apted’s famous “7 Up” series; they come back to their subjects for an update every five years or so. A new – and the brothers say final – version of the film will air on CBS on the 10th anniversary, with a new 25-minute epilogue that concentrates on the serious health woes firefighters and first-responders have suffered in recent years, and the lack of federal support. “It is extraordinary how much the firefighter today is going to die after saving 20,000 people on that day and every single day,” Jules says. “He is going to die alone, abandoned by his city, by his government, by his country. It is amazing.”

When the brothers, in the weeks after 9/11, went back to their editing studio and realized what they had, they turned down countless offers to simply sell all the footage to a network or movie studio, insisting on having control over their own film. Les Moonves of CBS – with a hand from family friend Graydon Carter and their agent, then-William Morris bigshot Ben Silverman – gave them that freedom, and they keep final cut to this day. For many, the showing of the Naudet brothers’ film on the second-anniversary of the attacks, the first night of the Tribute in Light, was a chance to heal among groups huddled around a television. “We wanted people to live by proxy through the film,” Jules says. “We made it a point not to make it about the political implications.”

For whatever reason, perhaps the brothers’ heavy French accents, there is a general misconception that the Naudets just happened to grab their footage before heading back to Paris or something. But they grew up on the Upper East Side, in the same apartment that Gideon, 38, still lives in (Jules, 41, who has two children, moved to Connecticut). “I think they imagine us as tourists or something,” Gideon says. “Like we spent two weeks filming and we moved back. This is our city.” In the last decade, they’ve made another film for CBS, a documentary about religious faith called “In God’s Eyes,” and they’re currently working on a film in which they speak with all living former White House Chiefs of Staff about their crazy jobs. But they’ll always be known as the 9/11 filmmakers, which would be easily to handle if more people realized they were professional filmmakers, rather than just two dopes who happened to be standing near the towers. “For us, nothing much has changed,” Gideon says. “We still go and have to start from zero. We go and see different networks and get the same answers. Sorry, we are not interested. It is exactly like for ‘9/11.’  Then we end up producing it and financing it ourselves. I guess we got used to it.”

They also have a somewhat more modern headache, what Urban Dictionary might call a “Santorum Problem:” If you search either one of their names on Google, because Jules’ initial pan up was breathtaking and unique, you find countless pages of conspiracy theorists accusing the brothers of being CIA plants, having foreknowledge of 9/11 or even helping orchestrate the attacks themselves. In a cruel irony, much of the “evidence” is based in the fact that the brothers have been so quiet over the last decade, as if they were plants, or even silenced. I can vouch for their existence. “Please tell them I am not a UFO,” Jules says.

Often it isn’t so clear, even to survivors themselves. The very nature of abuse is that abusers make it tough for victims themselves to identify what’s happening. This spring, Rachel Sklar described what it’s like to be on the receiving end of abuse: “It’s anger wrapped in fear, guilt, self-doubt, helplessness, sadness — so you shift from defensive mode into comfort mode, where you are the person who is calm and caring and reassuring. You’re the one who has it together. He’s the one who needs help, and you’re the one who’s helping. You learn to work around his triggers and do the things to soothe him and to leave parties quickly and to pick your battles.” You may break up with him and realize how bad it had gotten and still never label it “abuse.” — This. (via The NFL’s Disgusting Message to Abused Women)
goldenfiddle:

Making Gone With The Wind

Notes on the next time: I need a life where I get to sit around and hold a sign that just says, “Tear Stains” and that is really my job.

goldenfiddle:

Making Gone With The Wind

Notes on the next time: I need a life where I get to sit around and hold a sign that just says, “Tear Stains” and that is really my job.

poldberg:

While there is a lot of appropriate rage about Ferguson right now, the killing of John Crawford, III is getting less attention than it deserves. I put Shaun King’s tweets and history lesson on the matter in chronological order for easier consumption.

Links:

Autopsy and video show John Crawford shot from behind in Wal-Mart

Witness in murder of John Crawford changes story

You really should be following Shaun King on Twitter.

(via danielleh)

checkittwice:

swimmy swim

checkittwice:

swimmy swim

(Source: serenepoptarts)

I heard if you write it down, it comes true faster.  (at workhole)

I heard if you write it down, it comes true faster. (at workhole)

I’ve discovered two secrets. 
The first: set aside one hour on Friday afternoon to do a speed-clean: whatever you can get done in an hour is what gets done. You’ll be amazed at how much you accomplish. 
The second secret is even simpler: stop giving a shit. Really. 
(via Friday Night Meatballs: How to Change Your Life With Pasta)

I’ve discovered two secrets.
The first: set aside one hour on Friday afternoon to do a speed-clean: whatever you can get done in an hour is what gets done. You’ll be amazed at how much you accomplish.
The second secret is even simpler: stop giving a shit. Really.
(via Friday Night Meatballs: How to Change Your Life With Pasta)

If there’s one thing certain, it’s there ain’t nothing for sure.                  9/10 (at Grand Ferry)

If there’s one thing certain, it’s there ain’t nothing for sure. 9/10 (at Grand Ferry)

9/10 (at Grand Ferry)

9/10 (at Grand Ferry)