stillast*r

It just seems like we're taking all the last vowels out of words now.
New Morning.  (at The 808)

New Morning. (at The 808)

It smells like old shark in the lobby at work.  (at workhole)

It smells like old shark in the lobby at work. (at workhole)

Forget everything we know and love about physical magazines. Forget their length. Forget their size. Forget their weekly or monthly publishing schedule. Forget all these qualities except for one: What it’s like to come to an end, and to take a deep breath. What does a bookend — an edge — mean for narrative arc? Broadly, it helps define the shape of the arc. The experience of a bundle of content changes depending on how it’s packaged. …In other words: It’s difficult to shape a narrative without a pause, just as it’s hard to craft a beautiful page without whitespace. Possible, but unlikely. — (via Unbindings and edges)
I’m a little bothered by the hypocrisy exhibited by the new generation of Silicon Valley leaders. They’re code writers, and software is different from hardware. With software people, there is this big, romantic philosophy—“Do no evil”—yet it’s always combined with a sort of duplicity. These guys who are running the social-networking era, they’re really behaving like oligarchs: “You know the reason we’re successful is that we’re special. We’re smarter than other people.” You didn’t see that in the early generation of Silicon Valley leaders. They were the children of blue-collar working families. They worked with their hands. So they didn’t try to be your whole world. They didn’t build a campus for you to live on twenty-four hours a day, like in a dorm. They expected you to go home to your family. They had an admiration for working people. You just don’t see that right now with the social-networking guys. Average folks in the Valley, especially poor people, have a really strong sense that these guys don’t care about them. And I think it manifests itself in all sorts of ways, like working with the N.S.A., and the perpetual effort to monetize our private information. It’s a very different world. — …a *little* bothered, yes. (via Of Microchips and Men: A Conversation About Intel)
if Condé Nast employees cannot walk there in heels, they will not walk there at all. — But, of COURSE. (via How Far Can a Condé Nast Employee Walk in Heels?)
We do not discuss Chris Brown in this column. — @DaveHolmes is an American Treasure. (via Getting Nostalgic for Last Week’s Top 40 Songs)
This is what we call “slow news week”

This is what we call “slow news week”

You know what’s in here? Pie. #mostamazingmama (at workhole)

You know what’s in here? Pie. #mostamazingmama (at workhole)

Pirate, I’m ready. Let’s run away.  (at New Museum of Contemporary Art)

Pirate, I’m ready. Let’s run away. (at New Museum of Contemporary Art)

#friendswhoknowyou #toowell?

#friendswhoknowyou #toowell?

It has lately been made perfectly clear, for example, that while in many places women should not be allowed—and increasingly are not allowed—to run their own independent calculations about whether or not to get abortions, other people, unspecified people standing outside clinics, should be allowed—are now allowed—to get in those women’s faces and publicly render their judgments and voice their opinions about those women and their circumstances. These days, law enforcement can comfortably deem a Tennessee mother unfit and jail her for having taken methamphetamine while pregnant. Authorities can condemn—by arrest and the removal of her child to foster care—South Carolina mother Debra Harrell, who allowed her nine-year-old daughter to play at the park while she worked at McDonald’s. It’s such a comfortable pose, gathering around women and deciding what we think of them—hot or not, alluring or tragic, moral or immoral, responsible or irresponsible, capable of consent or incapable of consent, maternal or neglectful.

Just like to emphasize again: “It’s such a comfortable pose, gathering around women and deciding what we think of them—hot or not, alluring or tragic, moral or immoral, responsible or irresponsible, capable of consent or incapable of consent, maternal or neglectful.”

— — viaThe Problem with Esquire’s Praise of 42-Year-Old Women & Amy Poehler)

…while ads sustained my site for many years, this past year I’ve mostly done away with banner ads. I have a couple left on the site that will soon go away completely. I can only speak for myself, but I find that it’s much more interesting for me to work with companies directly on sponsored content that allows me to create a DIY project, a recipe, or a video than to have a lot of ads on my site. When creating sponsored content, I only accept projects that I would do anyway and that give me a lot of creative freedom to share my ideas in a better and stronger way than I could have on my own without any funding. I turn down anything that feels too sales-y or is a product or brand I would never use (and many bloggers, including myself, turn down way more things than we actually say yes to). It’s fun to see that some of my favorite sponsored posts have been some reader favorites, too. — (viathe changing business of a blog… - Oh Joy!)